Value


Images scanned from the actual program I found.

Nearly 7 years ago, I was in South Florida with an ex on a tiki-memorabilia expedition. We traveled around the smaller beach towns looking for buildings that had been built in the 60’s tiki style and then retrofitted with more modern looks, old postcards and flyers, and the like. We stopped at a garage sale in a run-down neighborhood that was advertised by a bored young girl standing on the corner waving at the traffic.

There wasn’t much there. Some old, boring clothes, paperback novels by John Grisham, lots of National Geographics… a typical disappointing yard sale. My ex glanced around and was ready to leave pretty much immediately. I found a paperback book on African myths and, though later my ex would claim he picked it up first and decided to pass on it due to its $2.00 price tag, a genuine, original printing of the program from the 1969 Woodstock Music & Art Fair.

Of course, I didn’t know it was an original at the time, or that the programs were inconceivably rare due to water damage to the boxes that held the programs intended for distribution at the festival. I just thought it looked cool. But eventually I discovered the truth and had it verified by a professional. Soon after, I sold it on eBay for a little over $200.00.

Why would I keep piles of worthless old photographs strangers and old letters most people-including the authors and recipients-would call garbage, but pass on a valuable collectable like that Woodstock program which would only appreciate monetary value as it ages?  Why would I sell off an item that references both rock ‘n roll and American history, two of my primary interests, but keep detritus that has no direct bearing on my life or hobbies?  How do I define my priorities so that these actions make sense?

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Published in: on October 11, 2010 at 3:58 AM  Leave a Comment  
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